Goria Corproation© 2016    PRIVACY POLICY

MAIL: PO BOX 1044 Summerfield, NC 27358

SHIPS FROM: 207 A Computer Drive Smithfield, NC 27577

888 GO GORIA 888 (464-6742)

855 FIREMATE 855 (347-3628)

Sign & Rod accessories 

29 CFR 1910.157(c)

 

Includes The Originial FireMate

 

4' Fiberglass Rod

4" x 18" Fire Extinguisher Sign w/ arrow down

 

Measures 34" in Height

Measures 21”x21” at the base

7-1/2" x 7-1/2" x 8" holding area for fire extinguisher

Durable HDPE Plastic

Designed To Nest and Stack For Efficient Mobility.

Knock Over Resistant.

Holds 5 lb., 10 lb., or 20 lb. Extinguishers

 

Units weigh 14 lbs.

Red or Yellow

Portable fire extinguishers can be an effective early response to a developing fire, if they are installed and used properly. In this section, we are going to review general information about the placement and spacing of portable fire extinguishers.

 

If employees use portable fire extinguishers to fight small fires, they must be installed in all areas of the workplace. To ensure each area is protected properly, ask yourself the following questions:

Is the extinguisher readily accessible in the event of a fire?

Is the extinguisher fully charged and working properly?

 

Portable Fire Extinguisher - Copyright WARNING: Not all materials on this Web site were created by the federal government. Some content — including both images and text — may be the copyrighted property of others and used by the DOL under a license. Such content generally is accompanied by a copyright notice. It is your responsibility to obtain any necessary permission from the owner's of such material prior to making use of it. You may contact the DOL for details on specific content, but we cannot guarantee the copyright status of such items. Please consult the U.S.Copyright Office at the Library of Congress — http://www.copyright.gov — to search for copyrighted materials.

Is the extinguisher readily accessible in the event of a fire?

To avoid putting workers in danger, fire extinguishers should be located throughout the workplace and readily accessible in the event of a fire [29 CFR 1910.157(c)]. You can usually find them in hallways, laundry rooms, meeting rooms, kitchens, mechanical/electrical rooms, and near exit doors.

 

Selection and placement

 

If employees use portable fire extinguishers, they must be selected and positioned based on the potential type and size of fire that can occur [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(1)]. The following guidelines will help you identify the number and types of portable fire extinguishers you should have.

 

Type of Fire Size and Spacing

Class A The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommends that locations such as offices, classrooms, and assembly halls that contain mainly Class A combustible materials have one 2-A extinguisher for every 3,000 square feet. [Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers (NFPA 10 (2010), Table 6.2.1.1, Fire Extinguisher Size and Placement for Class A Hazards)].

 

OSHA requires that all employees have access to an extinguisher within 75 feet travel-distance [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(2)].

 

Note: Uniformly spaced standpipe systems or hose stations connected to a sprinkler system for emergency use can be used instead of Class A portable fire extinguishers, if they meet the respective requirements of [29 CFR 1910.158] or [29 CFR 1910.159], provide total coverage of the area to be protected, and employees are trained at least annually in their use [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(3)].

Class B Locations that contain Class B flammables, such as workshops, storage areas, research operations, garages, warehouses, or service and manufacturing areas requires that all employees have access to an extinguisher within 50 feet travel-distance [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(4)].

 

Hazard

 

Extinguisher

 

Spacing

 

Light (Low) - Small amounts of flammable liquids used for copy machines, art departments, etc., that are stored safely and kept in closed containers. 5-B 30'

10-B 50'

Ordinary (Moderate) - The total amount of flammable liquids are present in greater amounts than expected under low-hazard locations. This can include garages, workshops, or support service areas. 10-B 30'

20-B 50'

Extra (High) - Locations where flammable liquids are present and used in large quantities. This includes areas used for storage, production, woodworking (finishing), vehicle repair, aircraft and boat servicing, or where painting, dipping, and coating, operations are performed with flammable liquids.

40-B 30'

80-B 50'

(Adapted from Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, NFPA 10 (2010), Table 6.3.1.1, Fire Extinguisher Size and Placement for Class B Hazards)

Class C Class C extinguishers are required where energized electrical equipment is used. The extinguisher size and spacing is based on its Class A or B hazard [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(5)].

Class D Locations where combustible metal powders, flakes, shavings, or similarly sized materials are generated at least once every two weeks must install Class D portable fire extinguishers not more then 75 feet from the hazard [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(6)].

Class K Locations where potential fire hazards from combustible cooking media (vegetable or animal oils and fats) exist must install Class K extinguishers at a maximum travel distance of 30 feet. [NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers. See Section 6.6, Installations for Class K Hazards].

For more information on types of extinguishers, see Extinguisher Basics.  

Fire Extinguisher on Bracket with height at carrying handle indicated at 3.5 and 5 feet. - Copyright WARNING: Not all materials on this Web site were created by the federal government. Some content — including both images and text — may be the copyrighted property of others and used by the DOL under a license. Such content generally is accompanied by a copyright notice. It is your responsibility to obtain any necessary permission from the owner's of such material prior to making use of it. You may contact the DOL for details on specific content, but we cannot guarantee the copyright status of such items. Please consult the U.S.Copyright Office at the Library of Congress — http://www.copyright.gov — to search for copyrighted materials.Installation

 

To prevent fire extinguishers from being moved or damaged, they should be mounted on brackets or in wall cabinets with the carrying handle placed 3-1/2 to 5 feet above the floor. Larger fire extinguishers need to be mounted at lower heights with the carrying handle about 3 feet from the floor.

 

Before installing any portable fire extinguisher, check the label to be sure it is approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory [29 CFR 1910.157(c)(2)].

 

Prohibited fire extinguishers

 

The following types of portable fire extinguishers are considered dangerous and should not be used:

 

Old Extinguisher having a shell construction of copper or brass. - Copyright WARNING: Not all materials on this Web site were created by the federal government. Some content — including both images and text — may be the copyrighted property of others and used by the DOL under a license. Such content generally is accompanied by a copyright notice. It is your responsibility to obtain any necessary permission from the owner's of such material prior to making use of it. You may contact the DOL for details on specific content, but we cannot guarantee the copyright status of such items. Please consult the U.S.Copyright Office at the Library of Congress — http://www.copyright.gov — to search for copyrighted materials. 1. Any extinguisher having a shell construction of copper or brass joined by soft solder and/or rivets;

2. Any extinguisher that must be turned upside down to rupture a cartridge or to start an uncontrollable pressure generating chemical reaction to expel the agent [29 CFR 1910.157(c)(5)]. This includes:

Soda acid

Foam

Water-cartridge

Loaded stream cartridge

3. Extinguishers that use chlorobromomethane (Halon 1011) or carbon tetrachloride as an extinguishing agent. These agents are toxic and carbon tetrachloride may cause cancer and can produce phosgene gas (used as a chemical weapon during World War I) when used on electrical fires [29 CFR 1910.157(c)(3)].

Portable fire extinguishers can be an effective early response to a developing fire, if they are installed and used properly. In this section, we are going to review general information about the placement and spacing of portable fire extinguishers.

 

If employees use portable fire extinguishers to fight small fires, they must be installed in all areas of the workplace. To ensure each area is protected properly, ask yourself the following questions:

Is the extinguisher readily accessible in the event of a fire?

Is the extinguisher fully charged and working properly?

 

Portable Fire Extinguisher - Copyright WARNING: Not all materials on this Web site were created by the federal government. Some content — including both images and text — may be the copyrighted property of others and used by the DOL under a license. Such content generally is accompanied by a copyright notice. It is your responsibility to obtain any necessary permission from the owner's of such material prior to making use of it. You may contact the DOL for details on specific content, but we cannot guarantee the copyright status of such items. Please consult the U.S.Copyright Office at the Library of Congress — http://www.copyright.gov — to search for copyrighted materials.

Is the extinguisher readily accessible in the event of a fire?

To avoid putting workers in danger, fire extinguishers should be located throughout the workplace and readily accessible in the event of a fire [29 CFR 1910.157(c)]. You can usually find them in hallways, laundry rooms, meeting rooms, kitchens, mechanical/electrical rooms, and near exit doors.

 

Selection and placement

 

If employees use portable fire extinguishers, they must be selected and positioned based on the potential type and size of fire that can occur [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(1)]. The following guidelines will help you identify the number and types of portable fire extinguishers you should have.

 

Type of Fire Size and Spacing

Class A The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommends that locations such as offices, classrooms, and assembly halls that contain mainly Class A combustible materials have one 2-A extinguisher for every 3,000 square feet. [Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers (NFPA 10 (2010), Table 6.2.1.1, Fire Extinguisher Size and Placement for Class A Hazards)].

 

OSHA requires that all employees have access to an extinguisher within 75 feet travel-distance [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(2)].

 

Note: Uniformly spaced standpipe systems or hose stations connected to a sprinkler system for emergency use can be used instead of Class A portable fire extinguishers, if they meet the respective requirements of [29 CFR 1910.158] or [29 CFR 1910.159], provide total coverage of the area to be protected, and employees are trained at least annually in their use [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(3)].

Class B Locations that contain Class B flammables, such as workshops, storage areas, research operations, garages, warehouses, or service and manufacturing areas requires that all employees have access to an extinguisher within 50 feet travel-distance [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(4)].

 

Hazard

 

Extinguisher

 

Spacing

 

Light (Low) - Small amounts of flammable liquids used for copy machines, art departments, etc., that are stored safely and kept in closed containers. 5-B 30'

10-B 50'

Ordinary (Moderate) - The total amount of flammable liquids are present in greater amounts than expected under low-hazard locations. This can include garages, workshops, or support service areas. 10-B 30'

20-B 50'

Extra (High) - Locations where flammable liquids are present and used in large quantities. This includes areas used for storage, production, woodworking (finishing), vehicle repair, aircraft and boat servicing, or where painting, dipping, and coating, operations are performed with flammable liquids.

40-B 30'

80-B 50'

(Adapted from Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers, NFPA 10 (2010), Table 6.3.1.1, Fire Extinguisher Size and Placement for Class B Hazards)

Class C Class C extinguishers are required where energized electrical equipment is used. The extinguisher size and spacing is based on its Class A or B hazard [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(5)].

Class D Locations where combustible metal powders, flakes, shavings, or similarly sized materials are generated at least once every two weeks must install Class D portable fire extinguishers not more then 75 feet from the hazard [29 CFR 1910.157(d)(6)].

Class K Locations where potential fire hazards from combustible cooking media (vegetable or animal oils and fats) exist must install Class K extinguishers at a maximum travel distance of 30 feet. [NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers. See Section 6.6, Installations for Class K Hazards].

For more information on types of extinguishers, see Extinguisher Basics.  

Fire Extinguisher on Bracket with height at carrying handle indicated at 3.5 and 5 feet. - Copyright WARNING: Not all materials on this Web site were created by the federal government. Some content — including both images and text — may be the copyrighted property of others and used by the DOL under a license. Such content generally is accompanied by a copyright notice. It is your responsibility to obtain any necessary permission from the owner's of such material prior to making use of it. You may contact the DOL for details on specific content, but we cannot guarantee the copyright status of such items. Please consult the U.S.Copyright Office at the Library of Congress — http://www.copyright.gov — to search for copyrighted materials.Installation

 

To prevent fire extinguishers from being moved or damaged, they should be mounted on brackets or in wall cabinets with the carrying handle placed 3-1/2 to 5 feet above the floor. Larger fire extinguishers need to be mounted at lower heights with the carrying handle about 3 feet from the floor.

 

Before installing any portable fire extinguisher, check the label to be sure it is approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory [29 CFR 1910.157(c)(2)].

 

Prohibited fire extinguishers

 

The following types of portable fire extinguishers are considered dangerous and should not be used:

 

Old Extinguisher having a shell construction of copper or brass. - Copyright WARNING: Not all materials on this Web site were created by the federal government. Some content — including both images and text — may be the copyrighted property of others and used by the DOL under a license. Such content generally is accompanied by a copyright notice. It is your responsibility to obtain any necessary permission from the owner's of such material prior to making use of it. You may contact the DOL for details on specific content, but we cannot guarantee the copyright status of such items. Please consult the U.S.Copyright Office at the Library of Congress — http://www.copyright.gov — to search for copyrighted materials. 1. Any extinguisher having a shell construction of copper or brass joined by soft solder and/or rivets;

2. Any extinguisher that must be turned upside down to rupture a cartridge or to start an uncontrollable pressure generating chemical reaction to expel the agent [29 CFR 1910.157(c)(5)]. This includes:

Soda acid

Foam

Water-cartridge

Loaded stream cartridge

3. Extinguishers that use chlorobromomethane (Halon 1011) or carbon tetrachloride as an extinguishing agent. These agents are toxic and carbon tetrachloride may cause cancer and can produce phosgene gas (used as a chemical weapon during World War I) when used on electrical fires [29 CFR 1910.157(c)(3)].